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Bottoms

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BOTTOMS

The earliest record we have found is some 1788 tax records that refer to Bottoms being owned by Anthony Crossley with David Hollingrake occupying. This probably refers to the farm and ale house that predates the hotel.

The Station House Hotel (Masonic Hall)

This hotel, built in about 1850 to replace the Freemasons Arms which was run by David Hollinrake (known as “Davie i’th’ Bottoms."). The Station Hotel was built with some assistance from the railway company and was described as "the principle house of call between Todmorden and Hebden Bridge".

Station Hotel

An advert from the Todmorden Almanac, late 1880s

In 1853 the Prince George Lodge of the freemasons, established at Old Bottoms in 1812, moved from Underbank to the Station House Hotel.

Masonic ceremony room

Masonic ceremony room 2004

Masonic robing room

Masonic robing room 2004

Masonic collection

Masonic collection cabinet

Masonic grandmasters

Masonic gallery of grandmasters

For further details about masonry, John Craven's 1886 book, "Freemasonry at Bottoms, Eastwood" can be seen at Todmorden Library.

From 1881 to 1902, the Guardians of Todmorden Union (the local good and great) met at the Station House every alternate Wednesday.

The Todmorden Almanac reports that "On 19th April 1889 at the Station House Inn, Eastwood, friends of ex PC William Pearson presented him with a gilt timepiece valued at £5.10.0. and £3 in money for the faithful and conscientious discharge of his duties".

On the other hand, another report in Jan 1891 describes "an exciting dog-muzzling case at Todmorden Petty Sessions in which a policeman at Eastwood was fined 1/- and costs of 12/6, for allowing a dog in his charge to have it's muzzle hanging round it's neck".

On 31st August 1892, William Pickles, alias "Peer", was found on the barn floor of the Station House Hotel, Eastwood, in an unconscious state and taken to the workhouse where he died the same day. It was supposed he had fallen about 20 feet.

Station Hotel

Advert for station Hotel circa 1890

On 12th May 1894 "The valuable freehold and copyhold estate known as "Bottoms", Eastwood, comprising the well accustomed and fully-licensed inn or public house known by the sign of the "Station House Hotel", now occupied by Mr John Widdup. After some lively bidding the lot was knocked down to Mr James Crabtree, Bridgeroyd, for £3710".

Station Hotel entrance

A The entrance floor to the Station Hotel
photo taken by Peter Hartley


John Widdup died in 1902 after being landlord for 21 years. Later landlords were a W.Crabtree and Thos. Dewhurst.

The Station Hotel was owned by Hammonds brewery who closed it in November 1966.

BESS PIT & EASTWOOD CO-OP

Next to the hotel is a small terrace. The first house on the corner was at one time the police house with a coat of arms of the constabulary. Before the second world war the police officers were called PC Blenkiron and then PC Slater. The next building is the site of the Eastwood Co-op (now a retro clothes shop).

Next is a terrace of two dwellings built by William Cockroft in 1870. He was living there with his wife Hannah (nee Jackson) when their daughter Betty was born in 1873 (joining older brothers Thomas and James). Each dwelling had two rooms at the Halifax Road level, an attic and a basement room. In the 1920s, Herbert Dawson, a decorator lived there, keeping his equipment in the railway embankment opposite.

Eastwood co-op

A charabang outing outside Eastwood Co-op
including members of the Dawson, Hartley and Halstead families,
probably taken in the 1920s
Thanks to Maurice Hartley for this photo.


The opening of the Co-op on 8th Oct 1895 was reported by the Todmorden Almanac:

"The new Co-operative Store at Eastwood, a branch of Todmorden Industrial Co-operative Society, was opened by Mr William Jackson, the president of the society.
After the ceremony the delegates, officials and others adjourned to the Station House Hotel, where after a substantial tea they spent a pleasant evening in toast and harmony".

The Co-op had over 250 members before the Second World War. The Dividends were paid out once a year and were sometimes 2 shillings and 6d in the pound.

Eastwood Co-op window

A close up of the Co-op window

Eastwood Tennis Club

The tennis club had one court and was situated on the land at the back of Bess Pit between the river and the canal (there are now allotments and gardens there). Members raised funds to build a pavilion which was completed in about 1920. The members provided teas every Saturday in the summer. Unfortunately the land was flooded and the pavilion destroyed, so the club was abandoned.

 

This page was last updated April 2009

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